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Gratitude at 29,000 feet

Leif Whittaker stands on the summit of Mount Everest 47 years after his father stood in exactly the same place

Story by Leif Whittaker ('07)

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Whittaker on reaching the summit: "For one small moment when I plant my crampons on the summit, Iím standing above everything. Everything. And there is no possible way to describe the elation I feel and the gratitude I have for the people who have made this possible." | Photo by Eddie Bauer First Ascent/Michael Brown
Leif Whittaker enjoys the views from Camp III (24,000 feet) on the Lhotse Face of Mount Everest with Cho Oyu and Pumori in the distant background. The summit of Nuptse is behind Whittaker. | Photo by Eddie Bauer First Ascent/Michael Brown
Leif Whittaker of Port Townsend is the son of Jim Whittaker, the first American to climb to the top of Mount Everest. | Photo by Eddie Bauer First Ascent/Michael Brown
Leif Whittaker nears the summit of Mount Everest. Behind him, climbers wait on the South Summit for their turns at the top. | Photo by Eddie Bauer First Ascent/Michael Brown
Mountaineer Carlos Buhler ('78) brought a Huxley College flag to the top of Mount Everest.

Our team climbs steadily through the fresh white powder that reflects our headlamps, illuminating the night. Steps and breaths go uninterrupted for hours. My toes are numb, but I can still move them. Am I willing to sacrifice a toe to get to the top? Depends on which toe. I focus on maintaining the rhythm.

A dark red sun rises in the sliver of horizon that remains unclouded. The color and light energize me at the perfect time; weíre approaching a rock wall that looks extremely difficult. I clamber up, breathing with deep and frequent intensity. I feel like Iím going to suffocate. When I finally surmount the obstacle, Iím forced to my knees. Something is wrong. I canít slow my breathing. The ambient-air valve on my oxygen mask is clogged with frozen spit. I rip out the valve. Thin air mixes. I can breathe again.

Online exclusive: Last night before the summit

Approximately eight hours after leaving the South Col, I reach the South Summit (28,700 feet). Gaining a view of the last 300 feetóthe cornice traverse and the Hillary StepóI canít help but think that my father must have been crazy. A foot to my right, the Kangshung Face drops 10,000 feet to the Tibetan plateau. An inch to my left, the southwest face drops 8,000-feet to the Western Cwm. I can hardly imagine my father straddling this ridge 47 years ago and ascending the Hillary Step without the fixed-lines that we now rely on for safety. Only now do I truly understand what an amazing feat he performed.

Have you summited Mount Everest? Send us your pictures from the top of the world. Email us a photo of yourself at the top of Mount Everest, and we may include it in an online gallery of Vikings who have made it to the top. Click here to see what Carlos Buhler ('78) brought with him to the top of Everest.

Shortly, the true summit comes into view. I know Iím looking at the true summit because it is decorated with a massive tangle of prayer flags. Tears come to my eyes as I climb the last few feet and Tendi, our lead Sherpa, embraces me. Iíve dreamt of this moment for what seems like forever; the reality is more extraordinary than I ever could have imagined. For one small moment when I plant my crampons on the summit, Iím standing above everything. Everything. And there is no possible way to describe the elation I feel and the gratitude I have for the people who have made this possible.

But our climb is only half over. My fatherís Sherpa, Nawang Gombu, said it best when asked what his first thought was upon reaching the summit. He spoke for every past and present Everest climber when he said, ďHow to get down.Ē

Leif Whittaker of Port Townsend is the son of Jim Whittaker, the first American to climb to the top of Mount Everest. WWUís 2007 Outstanding Graduate in English, Leif Whittaker spent the spring of 2010 on Everest with a climbing expedition sponsored by Eddie Bauer First Ascent. Heís preparing a multimedia presentation of his expedition as well as a book proposal and hopes to climb Denali in Alaska next spring. Visit "Born Out There The First Ascent Blog," to see more photos and videos about the expedition.